fotojournalismus:

Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014

Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.

Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images

Captions: 

1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.

3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.

5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.

7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.

9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.

10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.

mymodernmet:

Iranian photographer Hossein Fatemi, offers a glimpse of an entirely different side to Iran than the image usually broadcasted by domestic and foreign media. In his photo series An Iranian Journey, many of the photographs reveal an Iran that most people never see, presenting an eye-opening look at the amazing diversity and contrasts that exist in the country.

photojojo:

Ask the average person if there’s any nomadic herdsmen in their family, and you’ll probably be met with a blank expression. 

For the past 15 years, Dutch photographer Jeroen Toirkens has been traveling the globe capturing nomadic tribes and their disappearing way of life.

Documenting a Nomad’s Dying Way of Life

via Feature Shoot

atlanticinfocus:

From The Easter Rocket War of Vrontados, one of 26 photos. Rockets fly over bell tower of Agios Markos church during Greek Orthodox Easter celebrations on the eastern Aegean island of Chios on April 26, 2008. Two rival parishes of Vrontados village fire thousands of rockets every Easter Saturday aiming at the opposing church’s bell tower in a centuries-old tradition. (Reuters/Yiorgos Karahalis)

guardian:

These high-quality images may look like photographs of world cities at night taken by astronauts from the International Space Station – but they are painstakingly constructed from public map data and finessed by artist Marc Khachfe. See more

pulitzercenter:

The story of BC Roy, according to newspaper accounts, begins in June 2011, when 18 babies died at the hospital over the course of two days. The news was first reported locally, but the outrage spread beyond Kolkata’s city limits. On national television, newscasters labeled BC Roy a “hospital of death.”

Hoping to blunt a politically poisonous scandal before it spun out of control, Mamata Banerjee, the state’s chief minister, or head of government, who doubles as minister of home, health and family welfare, established an inquiry into the infant deaths. Heading the inquiry was Dr. Tridib Banerjee, a private practice pediatrician (who is of no relation to Mamata Banerjee), and is known as the pediatrician to the state’s wealthy and elite.

Dr. Banerjee created the High Level Task Force, comprised of a group of health care professionals, to recommend things like the allocation of new equipment, the hiring of new doctors, and anything else that might prevent future incidents of infant mortality at the state’s many government hospitals. As a result, the intensive care unit at BC Roy was expanded, and carefully vetted hires were made.

But the worst was yet to come. In September, two years after adding modern equipment that Banerjee assured me was “as good anyone would find in the best American hospitals,” an astounding 41 babies died in the span of six days.

Read the full story by Pulitzer Center grantee Michael Hayden here. Photographs by Pulitzer Center grantee Sami Siva. 

yahoonewsphotos:

'Displaced in C.A.R.': Victims of sectarian violence in Central African Republic

Scores of internally displaced Muslims are at the heart of the humanitarian crisis in Central African Republic, where violence between Christians and Muslims has threatened to spiral into genocide.


(Photographs by Goran Tomasevic/REUTERS)

See more images from C.A.R.and our other slideshows on Yahoo News!

guardian:

The deportees with nowhere to go

Just under 60,000 undocumented migrants were deposited in Tijuana, Mexico, from the US last year. Guardian photographer Felix Clay has been to Tijuana to document the deportees, soup kitchens and the homes of those who had built a life in America. See more